1/25/20 Encounters: Public Punishment, Race, and Remembrance

Saturday, January 25, 2010, 10am-12pm with lunch to follow
Old State House, 800 Main Street, Hartford, CT
RSVP to rebecca.taber-conover@cga.ct.gov

What does the history of punishment in Connecticut mean for us today? For twenty years, a reproduction stock and pillory have stood on the west side of Connecticut’s Old State House. Without any signage or description, myths and inaccurate information have grown up around them. But they have also spurred meaningful reflection on public punishment and its effects on individuals and communities. What, then, were stocks and pillories actually used for? Who was punished with such items? As historical artifacts, how do they affect passersby; and what unspoken messages do museums convey to people by displaying such devices with no explanation? Join us for a facilitation dialogue on the subjects of state punishment, the display of instruments of public humiliation, and the relationship between our museums and communities.

Lunch will be provided with free registration.

 

Readings:

Excerpt from

Life of James Mars, a slave born and sold in Connecticut
Published in Hartford: Press of Case, Lockwood & Co., 1866


Should museums remove or cover up controversial displays and links to history?