3/14/20 Encounters: Food Systems and Sustainability

Saturday, March 14, 2020, 10am-12pm with lunch to follow
Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT

2/22/20 Encounters: The 2020 Census and Moderator/Facilitator Training

Saturday, February 22nd, 2020 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM and 1:30 PM – 3:30PM Hartford History Center @ Hartford Public Library  500 Main Street, Hartford, CT RSVP to jeagosto@hplct.org Encounters is a structured-dialogue model that allows participants to come face-to-face and converse about the issues that matter in their community. Encounters dives deeply into these subjects through facilitated, small-group dialogues followed by a “question and answer”-style conversation with content-area specialists. Readings are provided beforehand to better encourage informed and informal dialogue.

Lunch to Follow The Census Event

 

1/25/20 Encounters: Public Punishment, Race, and Remembrance

Saturday, January 25, 2010, 10am-12pm with lunch to follow
Old State House, 800 Main Street, Hartford, CT
RSVP to rebecca.taber-conover@cga.ct.gov

What does the history of punishment in Connecticut mean for us today? For twenty years, a reproduction stock and pillory have stood on the west side of Connecticut’s Old State House. Without any signage or description, myths and inaccurate information have grown up around them. But they have also spurred meaningful reflection on public punishment and its effects on individuals and communities. What, then, were stocks and pillories actually used for? Who was punished with such items? As historical artifacts, how do they affect passersby; and what unspoken messages do museums convey to people by displaying such devices with no explanation? Join us for a facilitation dialogue on the subjects of state punishment, the display of instruments of public humiliation, and the relationship between our museums and communities.

Lunch will be provided with free registration.

 

Readings:

Excerpt from

Life of James Mars, a slave born and sold in Connecticut
Published in Hartford: Press of Case, Lockwood & Co., 1866


Should museums remove or cover up controversial displays and links to history?


11/19/2019 Dialogue on Race and Community

Tuesday, November 19, 2019
3:00 pm-5:00 pm
Student Union Ballroom,
Register here.

The entire community is invited on Tuesday, November 19 at 3:00pm in the Student Union Ballroom to continue the discussion of how we grapple with racism on our campus and how we might work together to transform our University to support racial justice. This necessary conversation will allow participants to engage in an honest exchange about how race and racism affects different members of the UConn community and our community as a whole. As we work to create a welcoming UConn for all students, faculty, and staff, we must begin by listening to the diverse and often hidden ways in which race is experienced at UConn.  Our hope is that such listening can lead to understanding, and from understanding can come actions that make UConn a more just, equitable, and inclusive community.

Our gathering will consist of two parts. The first hour will include a moderated dialogue and the sharing of personal stories and perspectives on race, community and confronting racism by 8 members of our community: Elly Daugherty, Dean of Students; Trisha-Ann Hawthorne-Noble, Director of Student Athlete Development; Tom Katsouleas, University President; Kazem Kazerounian, Dean, School of Engineering; Andrew Kim `15, Associate Director, Alumni Relations, CLAS; Avolyn Nieves, Undergraduate Student & USG Outreach Commissioner; Steve Nunez, PhD Candidate, Philosophy; and Mark Overmyer-Velazquez, Department of History & Director, UConn Hartford Campus. This conversation will consist of three rounds: 1. discussion of personal experience of race and racism; 2. discussion of race in society; 3. discussion of what kinds of changes panelists would like to see in order to make UConn a more inclusive and equitable community.

The second hour will consist of individual table dialogues whereby those attending in the audience will go through those same 3 dialogue rounds. There will be individual table facilitators to guide conversation and recorders who will take down what is said in the 3rd round, i.e. participants’ suggestions for change.

This event will be hosted by Glenn Mitoma, Neag/Director of the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, and co-moderated by Dominique Battle-Lawson, Neag, and Brendan Kane/History, Director of the Democracy and Dialogues Initiative. We look forward to seeing you there, hearing your voice, and continuing this critical conversation and collective self-reflection.

To register for this event, please fill out the form below. If you require an accommodation to participate, please email rsvp@uconn.edu or call 860-486-1001.

Attendance for the entire length of event is required. Light refreshments and snacks will be provided.

11/9/2019 Encounters: Afrocosmologies

Saturday, November 9, 2019
10:00 am-12:00 pm with lunch to follow
Wadsworth Atheneum, 600 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103
RSVP to faculty@wadsworthatheneum.org

What do the visual arts reveal about African-based religions and practices among the diaspora and in the Americas? In turn, how do those religions and practices influence black artists, past and present? What place does Hartford have in Afrocosmologies? Join us for a morning of facilitated conversation as we dive into these questions, explore the exhibition Afrocosmologies: American Reflections, and dialogue with neighbors and scholarly experts.

Lunch will be provided with free registration.

10/12/2019 Encounters: Public Punishment, Race, and Remembrance

Saturday, October 12, 2019
10:00 am-12:00 pm with lunch to follow
Old State House, 800 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103
RSVP to rebecca.taber-conover@cga.ct.gov

What does the history of punishment in Connecticut mean for us today? For twenty years, a reproduction stock and pillory have stood on the west side of Connecticut’s Old State House. Without any signage or description, myths and inaccurate information have grown up around them. But they have also spurred meaningful reflection on public punishment and its effects on individuals and communities. What, then, were stocks and pillories actually used for? Who was punished with such items? As historical artifacts, how do they affect passersby; and what unspoken messages do museums convey to people by displaying such devices with no explanation? Join us for a facilitated dialogue on the subjects of state punishment, the display of instruments of public humiliation, and the relationship between our museums and communities.

Lunch will be provided with free registration.

9/21/19 Encounters: Uncovering Black and Indigenous Histories

Saturday, September 21, 2019
10:00 am – 12:00 pm with lunch to follow
Hartford History Center, 3rd Floor
Hartford Public Library, 500 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103
RSVP to jeagosto@hplct.org

Who gets remembered? The Ancient Burying Ground is a state historical treasure whose many headstones commemorate leaders of Connecticut’s colonial past. More than 500 Africans, African Americans and Native Americans found their final resting place there, too, and yet rarely are they remembered by a personal grave marker. Join us for a small group discussion exploring the history of the Ancient Burying Ground and learn about the lives of Black and indigenous people interred there and their genealogical connections to our present community.

Lunch will be provided with free registration.

Please read the following selections prior to attending:

Narratives from the Ancient Burying Ground
The Natives of America by Ann Plato (1841)